ATC Group: J01DD Third-generation cephalosporins

Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System

Translations

Language
Translation
  English
Third-generation cephalosporins

Hierarchical Position

Level
Code
Title
4
J01DD
Third-generation cephalosporins

Contents

Code
Title
J01DD01
J01DD02
J01DD03
J01DD04
J01DD05
J01DD06
J01DD07
J01DD08
J01DD09
J01DD10
J01DD11
J01DD12
J01DD13
J01DD14
J01DD15
J01DD16

Active Ingredients

Chemical substance
Description

Cefditoren is a cephalosporin with antibacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens. The bactericidal activity of cefditoren results from the inhibition of cell wall synthesis via affinity for penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs).

Cefixime is an oral third generation cephalosporin which has marked in vitro bactericidal activity against a wide variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms.

Cefotaxime exerts its action by binding to one or more of the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) which in turn inhibits the final transpeptidation step of peptidoglycan synthesis in bacterial cell walls, thereby inhibiting cell wall synthesis.

Like other beta-lactam drugs, cefpodoxime exerts antibacterial activity by binding to and inhibiting the action of certain bacterial cell wall synthetic enzymes, namely the penicillin binding proteins.

Ceftazidime inhibits bacterial cell wall synthesis following attachment to penicillin binding proteins (PBPs). This results in the interruption of cell wall (peptidoglycan) biosynthesis, which leads to bacterial cell lysis and death.

Ceftibuten is a semisynthetic, beta-lactamase-stable, third-generation cephalosporin with antibacterial activity. Ceftibuten binds to and inactivates penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) located on the inner membrane of the bacterial cell wall. This results in the weakening of the bacterial cell wall and causes cell lysis.

Ceftriaxone is an antibacterial for systemic use, a third-generation cephalosporin. It inhibits bacterial cell wall synthesis following attachment to penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) leading to bacterial cell lysis and death.